Tacoma, Washington Employment Lawyer

5224 Olympic Drive
Suite 110
Gig Harbor, WA 98335
Phone: 253-858-6601
Fax: 253-858-6603
Terry A. Venneberg - Tacoma, Washington Emloyment Lawyer

Terry A. Venneberg

Since 1994, Terry A. Venneberg has represented employees in claims against their employers. His current practice is exclusively dedicated to the representation and counseling of employees in employment-related matters and he offers excellent and vigorous representation against large and mid-sized employers and any opposing counsel.

Legal Experience:

1994 to present - Solo practitioner in Washington and Alaska with primary emphasis on representation of employees in employment-related matters.

1993 - Associate in law firm with primary emphasis on construction law.

1987 to 1992 - Associate and partner in small insurance defense firm, with primary emphasis on representing public entities in employment and personal injury cases.

Law School:

Willamette University College of Law, Salem, Oregon Juris Doctor, 1986

Undergraduate School:

Willamette University, Salem, Oregon
B.A., 1983
Major: Political Science

Memberships:

Member, Board of Directors, Washington Employment Lawyers Association (Co-Chair of Continuing Legal Education Committee); Member, National Employment Lawyers Association

Member, Washington State Association for Justice

Member, Washington State Bar Association; Member, Alaska Bar Association

Articles:

Author, After-Acquired Evidence in Employment Cases in Alaska: An Alternative Approach, Duke University School of Law, 18 Alaska Law Review 59 (2001).

Significant Court Rulings:

Weil v. Citizens Telecom Services Company, LLC, 922 F.3d 993 (9th Cir. 2019) (Reversal of a grant of summary judgment on a failure-to-promote race discrimination claim under Title VII and 42 U.S.C. 1981)

Hendrickson v. Nichols, 2018 WL 5295199 (W.D. Wash.) (Denial of summary judgment in section 1983 sexual harassment case against county prosecutor)

Ware v. GEO Group, Inc., 2009 WL 4844672 (U.S. District Court, Western District of Washington) (Denial of summary judgment on Title VII claim of retaliation for complaint of sexual harassment by co-worker)

Alawi v. Sprint Nextel Corp., 544 F.Supp.2d 1171 (W.D. Wa. 2008) (Denial of summary judgment in case involving job applicant of Middle Eastern descent brought action against prospective employer alleging that she was discriminated against with regard to an open sales position under § 1981, Title VII, and the Washington Law Against Discrimination)

EEOC v. NEA, 422 F.3d 340 (9th Cir. 2005) (Grant of summary judgment reversed where there were genuine issues of material fact concerning disparate treatment of women in hostile work environment)

Personal Information:

Terry lives in Gig Harbor, Washington with his wife Jan, their dogs Hannah and Horton, and their cat Maggie.

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Terry A. Venneberg Weekly Weekly

Topic of the Week

Medical Privacy

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Blog of the Week

Thought for the Week

"From September 15 to October 15, the nation observes Hispanic Heritage Month. We at the EEOC are especially privileged to fight for the rights of Hispanic and Latino Americans. We are making sure that future Hispanic and Latino heroes will never be impeded, stymied, or discouraged from achieving their full potential because of national origin discrimination. Richard Cavazos led raids on enemy positions in war. We, too, must keep tackling the bastions of discrimin­ation, big and small, just as he did – over and over. "

–EEOC Chair Janet Dhillon on Hispanic Heritage Month 2020

List of the Week

from Economic Policy Institute

Working people have been thwarted in their efforts to bargain for better wages by attacks on unions

  • De-unionization accounts for a sizable share of the growth in inequality between typical workers and workers at the high end of the wage distribution in recent decades—on the order of 13–20% for women and 33–37% for men.
  • On average, a worker covered by a union contract earns 13.2% more than a similar nonunion peer.
  • The share of workers covered by a collective bargaining agreement dropped from 27.0% to 11.7% between 1979 and 2018, meaning the union coverage rate is now less than half where it was 40 years ago.

Top Five News Headlines

  1. GAO: Millions in danger of missing coronavirus payments
  2. California bill gives hope of employment to formerly incarcerated firefighters — but will it work?
  3. California halting new unemployment claims for two weeks to catch up on backlog
  4. A California Law Was Supposed to Give Uber Drivers New Protections. Instead, Comedians Lost Work.
  5. Can You Claim Employee Misconduct in an OSHA Citation?